Health effects of exposure to herbicide orange in South Vietnam should be resolved
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Health effects of exposure to herbicide orange in South Vietnam should be resolved report by United States. General Accounting Office

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Published by U.S. General Accounting Office in [Washington] .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States.

Subjects:

  • Veterans -- Medical care -- United States.,
  • Herbicides -- War use.,
  • Agent Orange -- Toxicology.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby the Comptroller General of the United States.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsUB369 .U55 1979
The Physical Object
Paginationiv, 38 p. ;
Number of Pages38
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4064102M
LC Control Number79601896

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Health Effects Of Exposure To Herbicide Orange In South Vietnam Should Be Resolved Since Vietnam veterans have been con-tacting the Veterans Administration about health problems which they believe were caused by exposure to herbicides in Vietnam. Problems in identifying personnel exposed to herbicides and determining the possible health. The book describes research areas of continuing concern and offers recommendations for further research on the health effects of Agent Orange exposure among Vietnam veterans. This volume will be critically important to both policymakers and physicians in the federal government, Vietnam veterans and their families, veterans organizations. Review of the Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides–Eleventh Biennial Update Share and cacodylic acid made up the bulk of the herbicides sprayed. The main chemical mixture sprayed was Agent Orange, a mixture of 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T. At the time of the spraying, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most. The assessment of human exposure continues to be a key element in addressing two of the charges that guide the work of this committee. This chapter first presents background information on the military use of herbicides in Vietnam from to with a review of our knowledge about the exposures of those who served in Vietnam and of the Vietnamese population to the herbicides and to the.

Because of complaints from returning Vietnam veterans about their own health and that of their children combined with emerging toxicologic evidence of adverse effects of phenoxy herbicides and TCDD, the National Academy of Sciences was asked to perform a comprehensive evaluation of scientific and medical information regarding the health effects. Assessment of human exposure is a key element in addressing two of the charges that guide the work of this committee. This chapter first presents background information on the military use of herbicides in Vietnam from to with a review of our knowledge of exposures of those who served in Vietnam and of the Vietnamese population to the herbicides and to the contaminant 2,3,7,8. The two active ingredients in the Agent Orange herbicide combination were equal amounts of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), which contained traces of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The dioxin TCDD was an unwanted byproduct of herbicide production. Dioxins are pollutants that.   Agent Orange was a powerful herbicide used by U.S. military forces during the Vietnam War to eliminate forest cover and crops for North Vietnamese and Viet Cong troops.

  The latest in a series of congressionally mandated biennial reviews of the evidence of health problems that may be linked to exposure to Agent . The Army Chemical Corps Vietnam-Era Veterans Health Study is a study of 4, Veterans who served in the U.S. Army Chemical Corps sometime between – to determine if high blood pressure (hypertension) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are .   "While the type of study conducted, a cross-sectional study, cannot be sure of cause, it does demonstrate an association between exposure to Agent Orange with its dioxin contamination and elevated blood pressure," says Dr. Arnold Schecter, a Vietnam-era veteran, dioxin scientist and adjunct professor at the University of Louisville Medical School and School of Public Health and Information. Characterizing Exposure of Veterans to Agent Orange and Other Herbicides Used in Vietnam is the IOM's report that evaluates models of herbicide reconstruction to develop and test models of herbicide exposure for use in studies of Vietnam veterans. Table of Contents. Front Matter; Introduction and Background; Foundation for FindingsFormat: Paperback.